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Thread: TPG: Week 28- Joe Webb

  1. StevenForbes Guest

    TPG: Week 28- Joe Webb

    Hello! Welcome again to The Proving Grounds!

    This week brings us Joe Webb, who had been lurking for a while, but then came busting out on the boards not too long after he submitted this. Let's give a hand to Joe, for being one of the Brave Ones. (I think that's my new nickname for all of you.) Like Sebastian said, subtlety isn't my strong suit.

    Let's hear it for Joe, and let's see what he's got!

    CROW HILL
    ISSUE #

    BY JOE WEBB

    “THE BOY WHO WASN’T THERE”

    PAGE 1 (7 panels)

    We open with a scene from the SHANE STEEL television show, Ring Of Steel. Shane is the superhero equivalent of any Danny Dyer character... a twenty-something, blue collar Essex-born jack the lad who also happens to be a telekinetic secret agent. The show is a ridiculous populist farce which has won him the admiration of many gullible viewers, and the contempt of a few cynics. This first page takes place completely in the show, so we’re unaware that it is a piece of television fiction. In this particular episode, Shane Steel is attempting to infiltrate a ring of shady child pornographers. (Nice explanation.)

    1 – We’re in an OFFICE. It’s around 6PM, after closing hours, and light is coming in through the blinds. One of the pornographers, BETTANY, a middle aged man in a suit, balding and stereotypically paedophilic, possibly with combed-over hair, is sat behind his desk in the background, facing towards us, lecturing SHANE STEEL. In the front of shot, to one side, we can see Shane from behind, perhaps just his mid section, as he faces the pornographer’s desk, arms down, but tensed, as if poised for a fight. Facing away from us, amid papers and files on the desk, is a small PHOTO FRAME, the sort a lot of businessmen have; loved ones, family, etc.

    BETTANY:
    You don’t fool me, Shane Steel. I know your game... You were never one of us.

    2 – Side shot of Shane Steel’s face as he grits his teeth, Dirty Harry fashion, cracking his knuckles. He is facing the right of the panel, looking towards the man sat behind the desk. Filing cabinets are in the background, and an office fan. (Do you want the side shot with or without the cracking of knuckles? Do this: go to a mirror. Bathroom should do. Something you don’t have to hold. Grit your teeth. Now, crack your knuckles. Do this right under your chin. Unnatural, right? So’s this panel. Watch what you’re saying, so you can get what you want.)

    SHANE STEEL:
    I should hope so too, dirty bastards.

    3 – Shot of the pornographer sat in his chair, sweating slightly. He’s leaning forward, his left elbow on the desk, resting his head on his hand, trying to look inconspicuous as he fumbles through one of the desk draws with his other hand. (Something of a moving panel. And depending on where Steel is, he’ll be able to see a hand in a drawer. You’ll have to add space, and the drawer has to be a lower side drawer in order for this to come off correctly. You need to be specific, Joe.)

    BETTANY:
    Now, let me guess. I tell you where the others are, or you beat it out of me. (Italics work, but they can be missed. It’s better if you underline the word you want to be stressed.)

    4 – Another side shot, pulled back slightly so we can see both men. Shane has moved forward slightly, and is reaching out with his left hand, turning the photo frame around to look at the picture of Bettany’s wife and daughter. (Strip away all references to paedophilia. Strip away the top explanation. The reader isn’t going to know any of that. This is panel 4 of page 1. What’s interesting here? I can tell you: nothing. Now, this is a moving panel. He’s reaching and turning, which are actions that are happening, not actions that have happened. Describe still images, Joe.)

    SHANE STEEL:
    That’s about the size of it.

    SHANE STEEL (linked):
    Cute kid... must take after ‘er mother, eh?

    5 – Back to the shot from behind Shane as he looks down at the photo frame, now in his hand, close enough for us to make out the woman and child. In the background, Bettany is producing a pistol from his desk, gritting his teeth angrily, desperate, leaning forward on his left arm. It seems Shane hasn’t noticed the weapon, preoccupied with the picture. (Nope. There are 7 panels on this page. These are going to be postage stamp sized panels. You’re not going to be able to get everything you want here. If you up the panel count, understand why. And it’s not just because you want to get more story in on the page. Comics have a rhythm. This is something you’re in the process of learning.)

    SHANE STEEL:
    You never struck me as a family man, Bettany.

    6 – Close-up headshot of Shane Steel, looking sideways, to the right, as if he’s just looked up and noticed, his eyebrows furrowed, looking out of the panel, leading us into the next page. (No, there’s no “leading to the next page.” That would be true if this were P2, but this is P1. What comes next is another panel, which is a page turn, not another page. Now, there’s no way to get the “as if he’s just looked up” across on the page. Not in a single panel. This would take at least three panels: the character looking away, the character seeing their danger, the character reacting to their danger. See how that works? This, doesn’t.)

    7 – Small panel, a close-up on the gun, shaking in Bettany’s hand, as if it’s aimed at us.

    PAGE 2 (6 panels)(Page break)

    1 – Mid shot on Bettany’s head as the picture frame, still in Shane’s hand, swings in from the left of the panel and hits him on the side of the face, glass smashing as he drops the gun and it falls in front of him. The gun is in mid air, falling out onto the desk. (Wait. A guy has a gun on you, sitting behind a desk. You’re going to get even closer, lean in in order to swing and hit him upside the head with a picture frame? I know this is supposed to be bad television, but the readers aren’t going to know that as yet. All they know right now is a lot of nothing, and they’re wondering why they picked this up in the first place.)

    SFX:
    KRAKKK!

    BETTANY (burst):
    AAAH!

    2 – Shane Steel, right hand outstretched as he performs Telekinesis, drawing the pistol towards him, bringing his left hand back from the swing. He’s tutting, raising one eyebrow, unimpressed, cocking his head slightly as if shaking it in disbelief. We’re looking over Bettany’s shoulders from behind him as he tries to pick himself up, slumped over the desk, face bleeding. (Moving panel. Tell me where, Calvin.)

    SHANE STEEL:
    Tut tut. I thought you ‘ad more sense, guv.

    3 – Side shot of Shane’s outstretched hand as the gun hovers in front of it, mid-air.

    SHANE STEEL (OP):
    Gun’s are a mugs game.

    4 – Same shot, but the gun is being pulled apart, piece by piece, falling apart, useless. (No. This is a moving panel. Watch your language. And what’s interesting about this panel, besides the TK? How does this push the story forward?)

    BETTANY (OP):
    Please, I’m... just a...

    SHANE STEEL (OP):
    A what? A mug?

    5 – Shot of Shane reaching over, grabbing Bettany by the shoulders of his shirt, ready to lift him out of his chair. The right side of Bettany’s face is full of little shards of glass. We can see the office fan in the background again.

    SHANE STEEL:
    Or a nonce! (Just curious what a 'nonce' is. I REALLY have to visit the UK and stay for a while...)

    6 – Shot of Bettany’s bloody face as Shane smashes it into the office fan. The panel is framed by the outline of a television set as we draw back from the piece of fiction.

    SFX:
    BZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZT

    PAGE 3 (splash with titles/credits)

    He we have splash panel, showing the LIVING ROOM of a terraced house on the Crow Hill council estate. It’s a typical lower middle-class house. The owners clearly work hard and have a little money, but the various tacky ornaments sat in display cases around the room scream the old adage; money can’t buy class. The aforementioned television is now on the right of the page. In the foreground, RAT’S DAD is sitting in his chair, screaming at the television with all the passionate petulance of a protective parent-***-football hooligan, tin of Carling in hand. Behind him, on the sofa next to his well-worn armchair is his wife, RAT’S MUM, who watches the television intently, half flinching at the violence. Past them, in the back, we can see the front door, possible at the bottom of a staircase leading upstairs. Their son, Reggie, or RAT, can be seen standing by the door, dressed in a hoodie, with a rucksack on, looking back at his parents. It’s late and he’s sneaking out of the house. He’s aged 15, quiet, reclusive, scruffy looking and short. He’s checking to see if they’ve noticed him trying to leave. God knows why. No-one ever notices Rat unless he wants them to, and even then, it’s an uphill struggle. Leave space here for the title and credits. (Where’s the drama here? Where’s the reason for this to warrant being a splash page? After two pages of crap, why should a reader care about this image?)

    RAT’S DAD:
    Get in there my son! Do ‘im!

    RAT’S MUM:
    Oh!

    RAT’S DAD (linked):
    Prison’s too good for the kiddie-fiddling wanker!

    PAGE 4 (6 panels)

    Cut out to a dark, streetlamp-lit ROAD ON THE CROW HILL ESTATE. It’s late in the evening, past nine, and the streetlights bathe the grey concrete in an orangey glow. Two white seventeen year olds, TOM and PETE, are at the end of Rat’s road, standing by an old bus stop. Tom’s talking on the phone, trying to score some puff off of DEVON. Pete is gangly, blonde, not that bright, but Tom, the alpha, a self-styled wide boy, keeps him around for laughs and loyalty. Tom has chiselled features, a larger-than-life personality, thick eyebrows and deep-set eyes. The two of them are dressed in typical hood rat attire – full tracksuits, Reebok classics etc. Rat is clearly in awe of Tom, and Pete openly resents the bond between his superior and the younger boy. (What does this have to do with anything? Put it in the appropriate panel descriptions. Some of this doesn't belong here.)

    1 – Rat putting his hood up as he goes out through the front gate. We can see the light of the living room he’s just left on behind him, glowing through the curtains.

    2 – High angle shot of Rat walking up the road, showing a bit more of the street he lives in... broad-fronted terraced houses with bay windows and little front gardens behind old walls with different gates, mostly painted wrought iron.

    3 – Close-up on Rat’s face as he looks up ahead of him, toward the two older guys.

    4 – Shot from behind Rat, showing him approaching the bus stop on the corner, where his street meets a main road. The outlines of Tom and Pete are by the bus stop. The outline of Pete is leaning up against it, while Tom talks on the phone. but we can’t make either of them out yet.

    TOM (whisper/distant):
    Alright Dev mate, no worries. Nah, Dylan’s dry too.

    5 – Zoom in closer to show, over Rat’s shoulder, the two young men at the bus stop as he nears them. Pete is watching Tom, who faces the main road, holding his phone, sneering down at it. He’s finished the call, disappointed. Neither have noticed Rat approach.

    TOM:
    Wasteman.

    6 – Panel showing Tom putting his phone into his pocket, and turning to notice Rat behind him, one eyebrow up. We can see Rat’s dark street stretching out behind them in the background, and the main road is behind us.

    TOM (linked): (linked to what?)
    Oh, Rat. Didn’t see you there. Thought you might’ve battied it.

    RAT:
    Nah.

    PAGE 5 (5 panels) (page break)

    1 – Side-view panel establishing the height difference between Rat and Tom, as Tom reaches down slightly to bump knuckles with Rat. Pete stands at the edge of panel, arms crossed, looking away, annoyed as Rat stands between him and his superior. We’ve turned 180 since the last panel of page 4, and we’re looking away from Rat’s street, and across the main road, from the bus stop. A liquor/convenience store is just across the other side, lit up.

    TOM:
    What’s crackin’ little man? You good yeah?

    RAT:
    Yeah. S’pose.

    2 – Rat looking down, shuffling his feet slightly. Tom’s smiling, warm, rubbing Rat’s hair roughly with one hand as he looks back at Pete, mocking him. (No. Moving panel. How are you going to show shuffling feet? How are you going to show rubbing hair ‘roughly’? When you add descriptors, you add movement. Think in still images. Yes, I’m a broken record.)

    TOM:
    A man of few words! See, Peter, you’d do well to watch this one. Might learn something.

    3 – Back to the side view, but closer in now, to convey emotion. Pete is leering over Rat slightly, annoyed, blunt. Rat looks uncomfortable, not making eye contact, while Tom looks at Pete, annoyed with his response.

    PETE:
    Leave it out, Tom.

    PETE (linked):
    You gonna get us some booze or wot?

    TOM:
    See, this is exactly what I’m talking about...

    4 – POV shot looking up from Rat’s height as Tom gives Pete a dig in the stomach. Pete looks slightly winded, the punch knocking the air out of him. (No. How can you look slightly winded?)

    SFX:
    THD

    PETE:
    UGH

    TOM:
    No ****ing manners.

    5 – Back to a smiling Tom, all warmth and friendship towards Rat, rubbing his throat melodramatically as Pete stands back, holding his stomach and looking cut down, not angry, more like a dog that’s just been put in its place. Tom’s gesturing over at the convenience shop across the main road. (NO. Joe, this isn’t film. Stop writing like it is. You've gone from writing still images to moving ones.)

    TOM:
    Now, squire, if you’d be so kind as to procure us some refreshment... I’m parched.

    And here’s where I’m going to stop.

    This, sirrah, is no better than the piece this replaced. In some respects, it’s worse. Let’s run it down.

    First, these five pages are boring as hell. There’s absolutely nothing here to make anyone want to keep reading, but absolutely everything here to make everyone put this back on the shelf. You titled the e-mail you sent this as “more tripe,” and that about sums this up.

    The first three pages of this are an absolute waste of space. I didn’t read anything past P5, because you didn’t make anything interesting enough to make me want to read that far. We have 2 pages of a tv show, and then a wasted splash page going into the real world.

    The first two pages are over-paneled. Seven and six, in order to be boring? No. That’s bad pacing. The first page should have been five panels, and the second page should have been five, as well, with the television set becoming more and more evident over three panels, pulling out to show the tv and the family watching it.

    Splash page? No. One large panel showing Rat, and then him sneaking out the house. Four panels for that page.

    None of that, however, helps the other two pages, because there’s nothing of interest happening in these pages. I’m bored out of my skull, and wondering when Satan’s going to show up, or if there’s a blazing mountain of ice somewhere that needs to be conquered by a bandersnatch.

    If you’re going to do talking heads, if you’re going to do something akin to real-life drama, then you have to be interesting from the outset. You have to have something to hook the reader immediately, or else they’ll put it back on the shelf.

    I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again, and I’ll say it until everyone gets it: you have no more than three pages to get a reader invested in your story. If you take longer than three pages, you’ve already lost. YOU DO NOT HAVE TIME TO TAKE A LEISURELY STROLL WITH THE STORY. As an unknown, you have to be interesting right out the gate. You have to hit them hard, you have to hit them fast, and you cannot let go until they’ve gotten to the last page. Anything less than that is failure.

    Go read American Virgin, from Vertigo. Interesting title, and then, it goes on to be interesting within the first three pages of setup. And it's set in the real world. No vampires or ghosts or anything like that.

    I understand you’re trying to set up a status quo. Here are the realities you have to face when doing it: you have to do it well, and you have to do it fast. As an unknown, for right now, you HAVE to set up your conflict within three pages. Here, you waste an entire page with a splash that does nothing to move the story forward. There’s no dramatic impact, there’s no revelation, there’s nothing there besides this boring image trying to make it, and doing a terrible job at it. What do we know in these three pages? That there’s a bad television show that’s being watched, and a boy is leaving the house. I’m riveted.

    You have to do it better, Joe, and you have to do it faster. Let’s put it in terms of sex: you have to come damned close to blowing your wad in three pages or less. I can’t put it any simpler than that.

    What’s the point of starting out with the show? You chose to start there for a reason. I want to know what that reason is. What does the show have to do with anything?

    The moving panels…not a fan of them. I can see the still images (mostly) that you’re going for, but that’s not what you’re saying in the panel descriptions. Watch your descriptors. Descriptors are what you add to novels and film, not to comic book scripts. Know which descriptors you can and cannot get away with. Watch your language when you’re writing. A couple of those moving panels would be just fine with a simple rearrangement of words, or substituting one word for another. After you pay attention to it for a while, it becomes easier.


    That’s really about it. Look to the list to see who’s up next.

    Let’s discuss this.



  2. AdamH Guest

    Another excellent review, Steven. I think you hit it on the head with your "this isn't film" comment. A lot of the panel descriptions read like scene descriptions from movie or TV. That being said, I do think writing static panels can one of the most difficult things to pick up when writing for comics. I always use the analogy of running through my script like a movie in my head, then freezing the frames of the most important scenes and writing them down.

    Also, I had no idea who Danny Dyer was or what a nonce was. It's a regional thing, but if you have an American editor he might ask you about.

    -Adam Hudson



  3. Dungbeetle Guest

    Thanks Forbes... if I was one of the Brave Ones I probably wouldn't have swapped scripts at the last minute!

    Points all well and duly noted. I know the story isn't pant-jizzingly exciting, so I'm glad you focussed more on the technical aspects. I'll keep my initial scene descriptions down as much as possible and watch the moving panels. I do think in still images, I just need to describe those still images better. Maybe I should start sketching while I write. I suppose the reason for opening it how I did was wanting to start with action, as well as setting Steel up as a hero who turns out to be a douche in real life. Was also trying to show that Rat's parents have pretty normal lower middle class views but despite their righteous anger at this and that don't notice whether their own kid's there or not. I get what you're saying though, I get caught up in the long haul of the story and sell it short before I've even started... Maybe it's time for the Lost narrative method - i.e. start from halfway through the story, use flashbacks for exposition which in turn hold back finding out what's gonna happen next. Gratifying.

    And "nonce" is slang for a sex offender - offensive but not extremely so, sort of thing you'd hear on TV at 9pm. It's supposedly a prison anacronym for Not On Normal Communal Exercise or something.



  4. Dungbeetle Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by AdamH View Post

    Also, I had no idea who Danny Dyer was or what a nonce was. It's a regional thing, but if you have an American editor he might ask you about.

    -Adam Hudson
    No doubt. That's character design stuff though innit?

    So, if I ever get a job at the big 2, do you reckon I'd be able to sneak "NonceForce" under the radar as a creator owned project?



  5. CalvinCamp Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenForbes View Post
    2 – Shane Steel, right hand outstretched as he performs Telekinesis, drawing the pistol towards him, bringing his left hand back from the swing. He’s tutting, raising one eyebrow, unimpressed, cocking his head slightly as if shaking it in disbelief. We’re looking over Bettany’s shoulders from behind him as he tries to pick himself up, slumped over the desk, face bleeding. (Moving panel. Tell me where, Calvin.)
    The movement of the gun being drawn towards Shane can't be shown in a single panel. What you'll get is a gun floating in midair. However... if you don't mind the gun seeming to move quickly, some speedlines coming off the gun could probably make it work.


    Steven,
    Some of your comments on this script bring up a question I've been pondering, and I'd appreciate your thoughts on it, if you wouldn't mind.

    I've read some stuff on comics writing that says there should always be a splash page at the beginning of any comic, either on the first page or thereabouts. The apparent reasoning is to provide a place for the title and credits. Personally I can't see the point, when the title/credits could as easily be on the inside cover or even a single, slightly larger panel. And it also seems (especially given your emphasis on the importance of getting the story moving in the first several pages) that there are better uses for those pages. Combined with your advice about only using splash pages for scenes that really deserve one, I can't help thinking that putting a splash page up front is (usually) a bad idea.

    So, what are your feelings on up-front splash pages?



  6. AdamH Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by Dungbeetle View Post
    No doubt. That's character design stuff though innit?

    So, if I ever get a job at the big 2, do you reckon I'd be able to sneak "NonceForce" under the radar as a creator owned project?
    After reading the wikipedia definition I'm surprised Garth Ennis hasn't already put out a NonceForce comic.

    I don't even want to imagine what their powers would be, maybe like the Green Lantern Corps but instead of the color yellow, soap is their weakness. Maybe? maybe?



  7. CalvinCamp Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by Dungbeetle View Post
    Maybe it's time for the Lost narrative method - i.e. start from halfway through the story, use flashbacks for exposition which in turn hold back finding out what's gonna happen next.
    You could do that. Or you could start the story in the same place you did, cover most of the same ground, and probably do it in two pages. The story you have here is not entirely uninteresting, it's just moving too slow.

    That Shane Steel scene went on (and on) for two pages. You don't need that much room. Forget all the back and forth nattering. He's an action hero isn't he? So get to the action. Have Steel bust in on the nonce with an accusation, the nonce pulls his gun, Steel uses his telekinesis to dismantle it, Steel yanks the nonce out of the chair for a good beating. (You don't really need the ceiling fan thing, so skip it) Now, you're five panels in and showing Rat sneaking out. And it's still the first page.

    Do the same thing with the kids - one page. Then, by page three, Rat is in the convenience store stealing beer (I assume).



  8. StevenForbes Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by madelf View Post
    The movement of the gun being drawn towards Shane can't be shown in a single panel. What you'll get is a gun floating in midair. However... if you don't mind the gun seeming to move quickly, some speedlines coming off the gun could probably make it work.


    Steven,
    Some of your comments on this script bring up a question I've been pondering, and I'd appreciate your thoughts on it, if you wouldn't mind.

    I've read some stuff on comics writing that says there should always be a splash page at the beginning of any comic, either on the first page or thereabouts. The apparent reasoning is to provide a place for the title and credits. Personally I can't see the point, when the title/credits could as easily be on the inside cover or even a single, slightly larger panel. And it also seems (especially given your emphasis on the importance of getting the story moving in the first several pages) that there are better uses for those pages. Combined with your advice about only using splash pages for scenes that really deserve one, I can't help thinking that putting a splash page up front is (usually) a bad idea.

    So, what are your feelings on up-front splash pages?
    Good call, Calvin. Good call.

    Now, as to the reasoning behind up-front splash pages...

    Back in the day, we'll call it 40 years ago, maybe a little less, the idea of the upfront splash was to act as something of a second cover. If the actual cover didn't grab you, then the thought was that the "second" cover would. (Don't ask me why this was thought. This was before my time.) Anyway, it's a convention that still holds somewhat.

    As you can tell, I don't really hold to that convention. But to continuing answering your question, comics generally don't use the inside covers for anything other than advertising. (Note the "generally.") This is especially true of Marvel/DC. So, you're not going to find credits inside the front covers, because that advertising is helping defray a lot of publishing/production costs.

    As for the credits being on the splash page...traditionally, this is where the story "starts" for many readers. They get the splash page with the striking image, they get the credits, they get the subtitle of the story. "THE GHOST FLOATS AT MIDDAY!" by Kletus Jerkovitch (story), Graeme McFreelancer (pencils), Flapjack McCullen (inks), P. Control (letters), and Crusty Eyefold (editor), an Asshat Comics production!

    For many readers (typically, older readers), this is when the story actually starts. If all of that isn't somewhere near the front, then the story hasn't started yet, and everything before it is prologue.

    Times have changed, and we've gotten more sophisticated in our storytelling. Now, the splash page serves a different purpose. For me, it's a striking image that serves to dramatically tell something about the story. It has to be large, it has to be moving, and it has to be a panel that wouldn't have the same impact if it were smaller. It has to be a focal point of the scene or the issue.

    When placed correctly, a splash page can move you to tears, or can make you feel the power of two titans fighting. I'm not ashamed to admit that a splash page made me cry, due to the story told and the placement of the image: when Aunt May discovered Peter's bruised, bandaged, bloodied body in bed, still in the remnants of a ruined Spider-Man costume. JMS built up that story SO well, that when it finally reached that point, it was so powerful that I had no choice but to cry. It was beautiful.

    I want you all to aspire to THAT. Make a powerful statement with your splash pages. It can be a small scene, a little thing, but it should mean the world. A happy ending, a great beginning, someone in anguish and vowing vengeance, an extremely powerful blow during a superhero fight...it doesn't matter, just as long as you're making a statement with it (and, of course, it pushes the story forward).

    To my mind, a good splash page is one that you can also see as a poster. It should tell a story by itself, just like the cover. It doesn't need to act as a second cover, but it needs to tell something of the story on its own merit.

    Does that answer the question for you, Calvin?



  9. StevenForbes Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by madelf View Post
    You could do that. Or you could start the story in the same place you did, cover most of the same ground, and probably do it in two pages. The story you have here is not entirely uninteresting, it's just moving too slow.

    That Shane Steel scene went on (and on) for two pages. You don't need that much room. Forget all the back and forth nattering. He's an action hero isn't he? So get to the action. Have Steel bust in on the nonce with an accusation, the nonce pulls his gun, Steel uses his telekinesis to dismantle it, Steel yanks the nonce out of the chair for a good beating. (You don't really need the ceiling fan thing, so skip it) Now, you're five panels in and showing Rat sneaking out. And it's still the first page.

    Do the same thing with the kids - one page. Then, by page three, Rat is in the convenience store stealing beer (I assume).
    THIS is good advice!!! THIS is what I'm trying to get you all to do! Not just for each other, but for yourselves, as well! If you incorporate these thoughts when you're writing your scripts, I guaran-fricken-TEE you that you'll come through with a superior product!

    Good work, Calvin! Do this when you work!!



  10. CalvinCamp Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenForbes View Post
    Does that answer the question for you, Calvin?
    Indeed it does. Thanks.

    Although the reason I thought of using the inside cover for the title & credits is from seeing it used quite often in Marvel comics for titles, credits, and recaps.

    Good work, Calvin! Do this when you work!!
    I'll be trying.



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