Page 2 of 2
FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: TPG: Week 39- Brian Augostino

  1. CalvinCamp Guest

    Welcome, Lee. It's great to have you here.

    Great food for thought too.

    As an artist, I like the idea of having the contextual descriptions included. Sometimes a brief mention of what the character is feeling, or what the character should be making the reader feel, is worth pages of visual description about what the character looks like, what expression they're wearing, what position they're in, etc.... not that the later stuff isn't important, but knowing what the writer is trying evoke by all those things can be incredibly helpful as well.

    I think mentioning the different styles of scripting is also interesting. I think TPG (in submissions and feedback) has mostly focused on a one-size-fits-all default, when it comes to the level of detail in the descriptions. And, unless you already know who you're writing for, I suspect that's probably the best (or at least safest) approach. But it's good to be reminded it's not the only one. Different styles may be better suited to particular projects or teams.



  2. LeeNordling Guest

    EDIT:
    Damn it. Damn it. Damn it.

    I was trying to respond to Lee and somehow managed to delete most of his post. This is all I could save.

    Lee... I am SO sorry.

    Calvin

    -------


    And this comes back to the line I quoted above: "And, unless you already know who you're writing for, I suspect that's probably the best (or at least safest) approach."

    I would think that SHOWING that you're the best writer you can be, and writing in such a way that the reader/editor/publisher will be able to IMMEDIATELY be able to visualize the comic is the best (or at least safest) approach.

    I think scripts with leaden details and descriptions are boring reads, so you should only write this way when you DO know you don't have to prove yourself as a writer.

    Interesting discussion.



  3. Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,678
    Post Thanks / Like

    Wow. Everything Lee said not only makes perfect sense, but apparently I was aware of without being aware that I was aware of it.

    Right now I have four projects going on.

    For one, my long time friend, Mike Dreher is handling the art. For Mike, I write what I need to. I describe what's integral to my vison, and leave everything else to him. I trust Mike completely, so I know how he thinks and he knows how I do. So, he usually draws what I envisioned, whether or not I described it to the letter. And the changes he makes, and he does, are always for the better.

    For the second project, the artist, Brian Wolf, and I work out all the specifics and details together and then I just put it in script form. By the time I get Brian the script, he is already 80% sure of what he'll be drawing, it's just a matter of how many panels and what goes where.

    For the third and fouth, the two artists are a little less sure of themselves, and I have to be very specific, both with descriptions and tone. In fact, for one of them, he's asked that I "Keith Giffen" it for him. By which, I mean that after I write my script I include thumbnail page layouts.

    So, yeah. I guess I'm pretty adaptable as far as scripting style goes. Though I hadn't really thought about it either way until this discussion. I'm just so thrilled that anybody would draw my stuff, that I'm all too happy to give them whatever they need to do so!
    Last edited by SebastianPiccione; Monday, November 09, 2009 at 08:26 PM.
    "Living Robert Venditti's Plan B!"

    CAT. 5



  4. CalvinCamp Guest

    Very interesting discussion, Lee.

    It seems there are two questions at work here (and probably no one true answer to either): What style of writing works best, and what level of detail in the writing works best?

    I'm with you, 100%, that the person reading the script should be able to easily visualize what the writer is trying to get across. That should be the goal, no matter what the approach to attaining that goal might be - I don't think it's possible to support a reasonable argument to the contrary.

    The "default" I was thinking of actually relates more to the level of detail, rather than the way the details are presented (dramatically or otherwise). How much detail is enough, how much detail is too much... that I think could vary quite a bit, and I think Steven has, over time, established a preference or "default" for what is an acceptable level of detail (though he may well tell me I'm imagining it). Whether the artist/editor/etc can visualize what you're looking for... that aspect is kind of essential, not much wiggle room there.

    As far as dramatic descriptions go (as long as there's enough there to get a solid visual from), I don't think they've ever been discouraged here, so far as I can recall. I certainly wouldn't discourage them, as I think they tend to aid the artist in visualizing what the writer wants.

    And, again, I'm sorry about messing up your post, Lee. What a crappy way to welcome you to the column. I'm just going to go find a rock to crawl under now.



  5. Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    3,678
    Post Thanks / Like

    Amusing to have an error with the "edit" button within this column!
    "Living Robert Venditti's Plan B!"

    CAT. 5



  6. CalvinCamp Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by SebastianPiccione View Post
    Amusing to have an error with the "edit" button within this column!
    Yeah... everyone point and laugh.

    I've never had moderator powers before, so I guess that's something I'll have to watch like a hawk. But what I want to know is... what the heck were they thinking when they put the "quote" and "edit" buttons right next to each other?

    Now let's see if I can make Seb's post vanish too...



  7. LeeNordling Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeNordling View Post
    EDIT:
    Damn it. Damn it. Damn it.

    I was trying to respond to Lee and somehow managed to delete most of his post. This is all I could save.

    Lee... I am SO sorry.

    Calvin
    So people get to know that I wrote something profound that's now lost forever.

    I could build a legend on that "lost" post.

    It's a fair trade-off.

    Now, if I could only remember what I wrote....

    --Lee



  8. CalvinCamp Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Nordling
    I could build a legend on that "lost" post.
    If you ever need someone to attest to the unmatched work of genius that briefly flickered across the web, and the tragedy that its loss has been, not only to the world of comics writing, but to humanity itself... just let me know. It's really the least I could do.



  9. LeeNordling Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by CalvinCamp View Post
    If you ever need someone to attest to the unmatched work of genius that briefly flickered across the web, and the tragedy that its loss has been, not only to the world of comics writing, but to humanity itself... just let me know. It's really the least I could do.
    Much appreciated.

    My memory of the early part of the post was sort of this:

    Safe isn't doing it the by-numbers way, not when you're trying to impress editors or publishers who don't know your work.

    Make the script come alive AND still do the work of it being a script, and THAT'S probably the safer way to go, because THAT will get you the attention you're seeking.

    The rest of the post was A-to-Z logic, a story or two, some active verbs, and an ounce of dry wit.

    Oh, and it was longer...novel-length, if I recall.

    But I can save you all the curiosity of what it was all about: Rosebud was his sled.

    --Lee



  10. brianaugostino Guest

    I've been MIA on this website for a little wile so I was startled to see all this activity. Thanks to Lee and everyone else for this discussion. I wrote these panel descriptions with the assumption that the artist would be a complete stranger. I wanted to describe what I saw in my head and really concentrated on detail. Some details that perhaps weren't very important. Calvin will soon be ripping apart some more of my script here in TPG. My panel descriptions aren't nearly as detailed. Maybe they are and I just used words more economically this time. We shall see. Writing a comic script is so damned hard. I sometimes wonder why the hell I'm doing it. I'll go through long stretches where I don't write anything. Other days, I feel inspired and will whip off 3 or 4 pages. I dunno...I feel I have a great story in here somewhere but don't know if I have the talent to pull it off.



Page 2 of 2
FirstFirst 1 2

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Archive Forums (For Archive Purposes only): General Comics Discussion, Original Works, It's Clobberin' Time, Respect Threads, P'wned, General Chat, Beat Down, The Champagne Room (Mature), Marvel News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), DC News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), DC News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), Archie News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), Comic Book Vitamins (See the latest columns here), Comics Are For People (See the latest columns here), Comics & Cinema (See the latest columns here), Comics Pro Prep (See the latest columns here), Bolts & Nuts (See the latest columns here), Seb-Standard (See the latest columns here), Webcomics You Should Be Reading (See the latest columns here), Development Hell (See the latest columns here), The Proving Grounds (See the latest columns here), Pixels Per Inch (See the latest columns here), Bargain Bin Gold (See the latest columns here), Dead Tuesday (See the latest columns here), Have You Considered... (See the latest columns here), Comic Book Vitamins (See the latest columns here)
Project Fanboy is now Fanboy Buzz.
Fanboy Buzz is home to Comic Book News, Comic Book Reviews, Comic Book Columns, Comic Book Forums and Comic Book Podcast
Check out some of our past podcast hosts doing podcasts at GonnaGeek.com. Sci-Fi, Tech, Gaming, Comics and More!