Page 8 of 8
FirstFirst ... 6 7 8
Results 71 to 72 of 72

Thread: Comics Cultures, Part 4

  1. harryd Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeNordling View Post
    Let's not wander around the goal, even though other aspects may be important.

    If it's to build a brand, and your next project potential isn't great, the overall assessment is pretty dead in the water right there.

    If it's build a brand, then you need to work on a commercial project that can ONLY help get you to that first rung.

    If your goal is to get experience, go through the process in order to understand it all better, then the commercial considerations won't matter.

    Now, this doesn't mean you need to change your goal...but if your goal for THIS project is to build a brand for yourself in one of the marketplaces, and your project potential is what you say it is, then you'll know why I might, at the end, suggest you dump this for working on another project.

    Yep, I know you don't want to do this...and I suspect you might really have another goal in mind, or one that's more true than to build a brand.

    See how these questions and the answers support or undercut one another?
    True, I guess the overall goal for this project could really be something more like: Getting some experience, and producing a story that I can be proud to be assosciated with.


    Quote Originally Posted by LeeNordling View Post
    If you have a different goal, this might be fine.

    I wouldn't tie success in indie comics JUST to "big names," though.

    You've been with us for a while now, so you know the THREE reasons projects can succeed.

    Brand/big names is one.

    High-concept commercial is another.

    Being the next Neil Gaiman is the next.

    Since the first of these can't be achieved without previous success, if you want commercial success/to build a brand, why would working on anything less than the other two possibilities be a consideration?

    Again, see how the questions and answers help us get to a cold, calculated conclusion?
    Fair enough. If the overall goal is changed to the above, then it's hopefully commercially viable enough. If it's not well done or novel enough to warrant publication, then sure, it probably should be scrapped, or at least reworked to be better. I'm hoping it's good enough to at least approach breaking even on production costs from my end, which is probably enough sales for the publisher to be making a profit.

    I'm not a big name, and I'm pretty sure I'm not the next Gaiman, which leaves a Commercial High-Concept. Does my project fit into this category? Honestly, I don't really know. I think the story would entertain me, and I'm hoping that by extension others would also enjoy it. But, I'm not about to put together a story about teenage vampire angst just to try to appeal to the Twilight crowd.

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeNordling View Post
    Well, if you go to The Seven Scenarios, you'll see that you probably won't be expected to give up ownership, so you're playing in a pretty decent sandbox for this.

    With two issues done, you probably won't have to consider this, unless the payment for the other 3/5 doesn't meet your needs.

    With making money not the big consideration, it looks like you're willing to invest in your career. Good for you.

    But is this the project to do this with, considering the sacrifices you're making?
    Maybe not, but it's better than my first/prior attempt to put something together. Now THAT was unrealistic in both scope, and flawed in execution. But, past aside, I guess it goes back to commercial viability. I'm hoping, perhaps foolishly, that publishers' self interest will be some sort of guide on this front. If they don't think that it will sell, then okay, maybe I'll need to go back and see if I have something that I want to do, that is also worth publishing.

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeNordling View Post
    You sort of ducked out on the last question.

    The question means are you counting on the payment or the royalties.

    Your biggest concern seemed to be getting your investment back, so royalties are the icing. That's fine, and probably a realistic assessment.

    So, it comes down to you making an investment in a property that might not be commercial enough to help you build your brand.

    I suspect, since you're sticking with this, that your goal might simply to be to make a comic, to get the experience, to see if your story can come to life the way you think it can...

    ...or...

    ...you believe the story is more commercial than you've said, and you're being modest.

    I think your answers need work, but hopefully my feedback is helping you to focus.

    At the end of the day, when the book is done, the best thing to say is: "I accomplished my goal."

    And if the goal wasn't fame or fortune, then that's okay, too.

    Your goal might simply be the accomplishment of having somebody else publish your work, to give it credibility.
    That may be a more accurate description. In the end, the royalties would be icing. I don't need them to live off of, though it would be nice to be able to, but I'm also not confident enough in my own ability to discern quality, or commercial viability, to take the financial investment of just self-publishing. I guess I really want to do something that's good enough for publishers to want to put it out, which may go back to the original question of a goal.


    Quote Originally Posted by LeeNordling View Post
    The trick is nailing this stuff well enough ahead of time so that you don't suddenly have an empty feeling when you hold the printed book in your hands and wonder what it was all about.

    Anyway, I hope this has helped you, as well as others to see how effective addressing these questions can be.

    Thanks, Harry.

    --Lee
    You're welcome. Thank you for taking the time to do this column.

    - Harry
    Last edited by harryd; Sunday, March 07, 2010 at 05:20 PM.



  2. LeeNordling Guest

    Quote Originally Posted by harryd View Post
    I'm not a big name, and I'm pretty sure I'm not the next Gaiman, which leaves a Commercial High-Concept. Does my project fit into this category? Honestly, I don't really know. I think the story would entertain me, and I'm hoping that by extension others would also enjoy it. But, I'm not about to put together a story about teenage vampire angst just to try to appeal to the Twilight crowd.
    I thought about leaving this thought alone, and decided I couldn't.

    There's a fascinating gut-check that creators have to the concept of commerciality, as though it ONLY means jumping on the current conceptual gravy train, when that is JUST NOT THE CASE.

    We can dance around this term a lot, but all it really means is that there is an editorial reason a project is perceived as being POTENTIALLY salable to enough people to warrant financially backing it.

    THAT'S at the heart of "commercial," not whether the creator is willing to become a hack and produce something he/she doesn't really care about.

    Asking somebody to be "commercial" doesn't NECESSARILY mean changing what they do, though sometimes, HONESTLY, it does.

    I remember hearing a mid-list author recount a decision she was faced with. Her last book had been successful, and her agent was telling her that she was on the verge of becoming a "best-selling" author, but to get there she was going to have to tailor her project decisions accordingly. The author opted to continue doing what she was doing, and was comfortable with that.

    But, to be clear, she was being asked to only focus on those projects that would appeal to that larger readership.

    So, to be be commercial, folks can do it by accident or on purpose. Some couldn't do it on purpose if they tried, as their choices of material are too personal.

    But selecting from all the ideas you have for stories is different than selling out.

    For those who CAN do it, it's about making market decisions; it's about ascertaining the best use of time and resources.

    This is another one of those myths about being "commercial" that folks need to consider seriously.

    Why?

    Because to say, "I'm not going to sell out and do what everybody else is doing to be successful" is a great excuse for not having to make the hard, professional decisions.

    It's perfectly okay to follow trends.

    It's perfectly okay to cull your editorial choices to increase chances for salability.

    It's perfectly okay to do only what's most personal to you at any given time, whether you or anybody else thinks it's commercial or not.

    As long as you know what you're doing and why.

    --Lee
    Last edited by LeeNordling; Monday, March 08, 2010 at 06:29 PM.



Page 8 of 8
FirstFirst ... 6 7 8

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Archive Forums (For Archive Purposes only): General Comics Discussion, Original Works, It's Clobberin' Time, Respect Threads, P'wned, General Chat, Beat Down, The Champagne Room (Mature), Marvel News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), DC News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), DC News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), Archie News UP TO April 2011 (See the latest news here), Comic Book Vitamins (See the latest columns here), Comics Are For People (See the latest columns here), Comics & Cinema (See the latest columns here), Comics Pro Prep (See the latest columns here), Bolts & Nuts (See the latest columns here), Seb-Standard (See the latest columns here), Webcomics You Should Be Reading (See the latest columns here), Development Hell (See the latest columns here), The Proving Grounds (See the latest columns here), Pixels Per Inch (See the latest columns here), Bargain Bin Gold (See the latest columns here), Dead Tuesday (See the latest columns here), Have You Considered... (See the latest columns here), Comic Book Vitamins (See the latest columns here)
Project Fanboy is now Fanboy Buzz.
Fanboy Buzz is home to Comic Book News, Comic Book Reviews, Comic Book Columns, Comic Book Forums and Comic Book Podcast
Check out some of our past podcast hosts doing podcasts at GonnaGeek.com. Sci-Fi, Tech, Gaming, Comics and More!